Free cricket match report: Imam Shakir leads Pakistan to tie

The first Test ended in a draw as weak light stopped New Zealand’s bid for victory after a late statement from Pakistan set a target of 138 in 15 overs. New Zealand hit 61 in 7.3 overs before the light went out.

The visitors went on the attack and adjusted the batting order to open Michael Blackwell. He was bowled by Abrar his Ahmed early on, but the attack continued until Tom his Latham and Devon his Conway, sweeping in a 57-run stand and he lofted five fours and sixes. pacemaker bowling.

Finishing off a seesaw day where New Zealand was able to advance several times without being able to close the door. Ish Sodhi’s six-wicket move gave Pakistan an early chance to knock them out of the tournament, but a missed chance proved costly.

With about 26 overs left in the game, Ajaz Patel fumbled a run that could have cut Pakistan to nine. Instead, Mir Hamza continued with Saud Shaqir on 81 balls and Babal Azam on 138 to take New Zealand to 15 overs.

Pakistan’s ability to get into this comfortable position was largely due to Saud’s Shakir vigiling his 108 ball with his 55. His first accomplice in challenging New Zealand was Mohammad Wasim Jr., who was by his side with 111 balls in a row of 71 runs. It came at an important time for Pakistan, who had just lost six wickets and the top batsman of the innings to Sodi. Before that collapse, Imam Ul Haq and Sarfaraz Ahmed held off New Zealand on an 85-run winning streak, hitting the pause button to confirm New Zealand’s bid for victory.

After New Zealand boosted their hopes with an early goal of the day, the counterattack came. Michael Bracewell catches Nightguard Naumann Ali LBW with an armball. And soon, Ish Sodhi joined the party and took a large wicket from Babar Azam. The Pakistani skipper started with some borderlines against Bracewell against him but was terminated by a googling from Sodi, leaving LBW and leaving while doing a review in the process. Meanwhile, Pakistan found solidity through Imam-ul-Haq, who suggested a sixth Test 50 to bolster things. He offered few chances, prompting New Zealand to frantically check catches on the racquet pad, replays confirming the ball was nowhere near the racquet.

Complementing Imam’s steadfastness was Sarfaraz Ahmed, who was promoted to the batting side, possibly because of his prowess with the spin. And the former skipper quickly fought back, sweeping Ajaz Patel to the limit and letting the weirdo continue wide. By winning that duel, he managed to keep New Zealand in check. Pakistan survived a few tight calls late in the session, with Sarfaraz forced to dive into the crease of back-to-back deliveries while scoring sharp ones.He scored a 7 right after the break I hit 50 at the second mark, but my joy was short-lived.

He quickly chased a short-and-wide Soddy, but Tom Blundell nibbled the bottom edge from behind the stumps. Aga Salman finished ahead of Saud Shaqir but couldn’t do much against a sharp googly that went through his racket and pad and hit a stump.

When Imam entered his 1990s and saw his tone in the 4th Test, he immediately tried to reach the landmark. This forced him to take several risks, one of which was his jump to Sodhi. Also, he gave Sodhi his first Test Five Fur when he picked up three wickets in the second session. Wasim Jr. and Shaquille stave off that rot, but New Zealand is back again in the final session. However, Shakeel and Hamza were able to hold their guard long enough to end the game again before Babar’s explanation.

Brief scores: Pakistan 438 (Babar Azam 161, Agha Salman 103; Tim Southee 3-69) & 311/8 d (Imam ul Haq 96, Saud Shakeel 55*, Sarfaraz Ahmed 53; Ish Sodhi 6-86) drew with New Zealand 612/9 d (Kane Williamson 200*, Tom Latham 113, Devon Conway 92, Ish Sodhi 65; Abrar Ahmed 5-205) & 61/1

Brief scores: Pakistan 438 (Babar Azam 161, Agha Salman 103; Tim Southee 3-69) & 311/8 d (Imam ul Haq 96, Saud Shakeel 55*, Sarfaraz Ahmed 53; Ish Sodhi 6-86) drew with New Zealand 612/9 d (Kane Williamson 200*, Tom Latham 113, Devon Conway 92, Ish Sodhi 65; Abrar Ahmed 5-205) & 61/1

Leave a Comment